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CDT Food Plan










A big part of the nutrition of a raw food backpacker is seeds and nuts. Unsoaked seeds and nuts contain enzyme inhibitors which make them hard to digest. Seeds and nuts are best consumed after soaking 6-12 hours (depending on the size of the seed) in room temperature water. During the soaking process, enzyme inhibitors are released and enzymes are activated. These enzymes within the seeds and nuts go to work breaking down the macronutrients (e.g., proteins broken down into amino acids, fats into fatty acids, starches into sugars). This saves your body the work of digestion, allowing the saved energy to be put to work fueling the muscles on a thru-hike.

One of the keys to successful nutrition on a thru-hike is abundant absorbable minerals. Balanced mineral intake helps keep the body alkaline, a crucial condition to maintain on a thru-hike as over exercise tends to load the body up with acid wastes. Minerals also act as co-enzymes for all the vital reactions that happen in your body. Appropriate mineralization of the human body is a key to health. In my opinion, most mineral supplements, since they are not plant-derived, will not accomplish this for you. Human bodies know how to obtain minerals from food. Supplements developed in a laboratory are highly questionable.

The best way to obtain minerals is by eating abundant organically grown vegetables. I’ll be using the sprouter sold by Uncle Harry’s (www.UncleHarrys.com), which is designed for backpackers, to grow fresh clover and alfalfa sprouts along the trail. I’ll also buy a few fresh vegetables (probably not organically grown) at resupply town grocery stores along the way and carry these in my pack for a few days. Fortunately, there are companies out there making quality green superfood supplements. Green superfood powders can be stored in an opaque resealable plastic bag on the trail to prevent oxidation of nutrients. I am fortunate enough to have the company making what I consider to be the finest green superfood supplement powder on the market as a sponsor. Healthforce Nutritionals produces a product called Vitamineral Green. If I have one secret, this is it. I’ll be consuming a ‘Health Drink’ three times a day on the trail which consists of:

Trail Health drink

2 heaping Tbl. Vitamineral Green (Healthforce Nutritionals).
2 heaping Tbl. of Really Raw Carob Powder (Goldmine Natural Foods).
1 tsp. of spirulina powder (Healthforce Nutritionals).
pinch of warming spices like cardamom, ginger, etc.
pinch of Himalayan Salt (Nature’s First Law)

I’ll put all these ingredients in an 8 oz. nalgene bottle, add water, shake and consume. The really raw carob powder from Goldmine Natural Foods adds an enzyme rich complex carbohydrate that makes the drink taste good. Most carob powders are heated. Even the ones labeled ‘raw’ which you can buy in Health Food Stores are heated to over 350 degrees in processing. Really Raw Carob Powder from Goldmine is wild crafted and unheated. Spirulina powder (blue green algae) from Healthforce Nutritionals is the most nutritious food on the planet. It contains a whopping 60% protein, more than any other food. Spirulina also contains every nutrient necessary in human nutrition. Himalayan Salt from Nature’s First Law is the finest salt on the planet. This unheated and unprocessed salt is actually good for you. It is free of the pollution which plagues sea salts, and the abundant minerals are in monoatomic form. This Health Drink is the most important part of my trail nutrition.

Joel Rodhner at Raw Life Line is another big supporter of the Hike-a-thon. Joel’s company ships freshly prepared gourmet raw food meals via overnight delivery anywhere in the country. The meals are in sealed containers shipped in boxes cooled with dry ice. Joel will be sending me gourmet meals to six resupply locations. Since I don’t eat at restaurants when I come into town, I will be so excited to have a fabulous tasting and nutritious fresh meal waiting for me at the post office. Joel will also be supplying raw dehydrated pizza crusts for my food boxes. Thank you so much Joel for your generous support of the Hike-a-thon.

I have saved the biggest and most generous supporter for last. The bulk of my food comes from Nature’s First Law. This company has amassed the finest selection of quality raw food available today. Their products are sourced from all over the world and achieve marks of excellence in taste, variety and quality high enzyme nutrition. A special and heartfelt thanks to David Wolfe and Nature’s First Law for their incredibly generous support of the Hike-a-thon. Thanks to Nature’s First Law, I will be hiking happy and healthy.

The rest of my trail menu follows. All items list the company next to them in parentheses which generously donated the food.

Breakfast

1) 8 oz. dried fruit (Nature’s First Law), and 1/2 cup soaked seeds or nuts.

Nature’s First Law sells excellent enzyme active, low glycemic index dried fruits: Mangoes, Persimmons, Figs, Papaya, Lucuma Slices, Goji Berries, Mulberries. Nature’s First Law also sells a variety of soaked and then spiced and dehydrated seeds and nuts (Celtic Salted Almonds, Pumpkin Seeds Sprouted). These are tasty and save me the hassle of having to soak seeds overnight. I will also consume the Raw Cashews from Nature’s First Law. These are the only really raw cashews available on the market today. All ‘raw’ cashews sold in stores have been heated in processing. Finally, the Brazil nuts from Nature’s First Law will round out my breakfast seed and nut variety.

2) 1 to 1-1/2 cups Raw Granola (Nature’s First Law) with 2 Tbl Really Raw Carob Powder (Goldmine Natural Foods), 1/4 cup raisins, 1/4 cup sunflower seeds.

See below for the Raw Granola recipe.

Lunch

Raw bread or crackers with tahini, pumpkin or almond butter (Nature’s First Law). The Flax Crackers and Super Rawckers Crackers from Nature’s First Law provide an excellent base for the nut butters. I like to add Really Raw Carob Powder (Goldmine Natural Foods) to the Nature’s First Law nut butters. The carob powder improves the taste and adds some quality carbohydrates to my lunch. Sometimes I’ll sprinkle some Dulse Flakes (Nature’s First Law) over the nut butter on my cracker to add some salty taste and quality minerals. Sea vegetables contain 20 times the mineral content of land-based vegetables.

Dinner

1) Nori Rolls: 1-1/4 cup soaked raw sunflower seeds and buckwheat groats.
5 nori sheets (Chinese Raw Nori from Goldmine Natural Foods)
1 tsp Himalayan salt (Nature’s First Law)
2-3 Tbl dulse flakes (Nature’s Fist Law) various spices

Most nori sheets on the market today contain crustaceans that have not been removed during the formation of the nori sheet. The nori is harvested, ground up along with the crustaceans, and formed into sheets for sale. Thus, most nori sheets are not technically a vegetarian food. The Chinese Raw Nori from Goldmine Natural Foods is crustacean free and thus a vegan food. See below for the Nori Roll recipe.

2) Raw Pizza: 2 good size pizza crusts (Raw in Ten Minutes, Raw Life Line)
1/2 cup sunflower seeds 1/2 cup ground up sundried tomatoes (Nature’s First Law)
garlic powder, dried oregano and basil 1-2 Tbl dulse flakes (Nature’s First Law)
1 1/2 tps celtic or Himalayan salt (Nature’s First Law)

See below for the Raw Pizza Recipe.

Snacks

(in between meals) – one or two per day

1) Cacao Nibs (Nature’s First Law)
2) Rawckaroon Cookies (Nature’s First Law)
3) Pumpkin Bar (Nature’s First Law - I really like this one)
4) Power wraps (Nature’s First Law)
5) Spirulina Energy Bar (Nature’s First Law)
6) Whole Carob Pods (Nature’s First Law)
7) Goji Bar (Nature’s First Law) 8) Italian Herbed Almonds (Nature’s First Law)

Other Supplements

1) MSM from Nature’s First Law - 2000 mg per day.
2) CoQ10 from Healthforce Nutritionals– 3 vegan caps/day
3) Enzymes from HealthForce Nutritionals – 3 vegan caps per day

Resupply Boxes

As a special treat in each resupply box, I’ll have a jar of olives from Nature’s First Law: Moroccan Olives , Raw Power Olives, Greek Olives, Peruvian Olives, Botilla Olives

Trail Recipes

Raw Pizza Crust
by Doug Walsh

2 cups soaked raw buckwheat groats (1 cup dry).
2 cups soaked sunflower seeds (1 1/3 cup dry).
3 cups grated carrot (3 med. carrots).
1 cup chopped, packed parsley (approx. 1 small bunch).
1/2 cup diced onion (1/2 small onion).
1 tsp. sage.
1 tsp. Thyme.
1 tsp rosemary
1 tsp celtic salt.
1 Tbl. Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 cup soaked flax (6 Tbl. Flax soaked in ¾ cup water).

Place all ingredients, except flax, into food processor with S-blade. Blend until homogenized. Mix in flax by hand. Form mixture into thin crust 1/4” to 3/8” thick on dehydrator tray. Dehydrate for 18 to 24 hours at 105? F. Turn crust over after 8 hours and make indentations with knife that will allow you to easily break off an individual serving size when dehydration is complete. Makes one 14” by 14” dehydrator tray (six 4” by 6” individual servings, after shrinkage).

Raw Pizza - dinner

Before heading out on the trail, I blend up sundried tomatoes in a vitamix at home. This produces a sticky dried tomato paste that keeps well in a plastic bag. When I first wake in the morning on the trail, I start sunflower seeds soaking in an old peanut butter jar I bring along to soak seeds. I carry these soaking seeds with me all day until I reach my dinner spot. I start dinner by adding water to the tomato paste, along with powdered garlic, dried basil and oregano, and Himalayan salt to make a pizza sauce. Next I grind up the soaked sunflower seeds in a 4 oz. baby food grinder (http://store.yahoo.com/saltoflife/hapbabfoodgr.html) that I carry with me. I spice this in an appealing way to go on the pizza as ‘cheese.’ I put the sauce and cheese on a dehydrated pizza crust, along with any veggies I’ve carried out of town and cut up, and some of the sprouts I’ve grown. Nothing like a gourmet raw food dinner on the trail!

Raw Granola – breakfast

When on the trail, I start sunflower seeds and raisins soaking before I go to bed at night. In the morning, I grind up the sunflower seeds with my baby food grinder and add the soak water from the raisins, along with a spice (carob powder) or two, to the ground up sunflower seeds to form a seed milk. I add the soaked raisins to the Nature’s First Law granola and pour the ‘milk’ over for a yummy and satisfying breakfast. One way to avoid the use of the Baby Food Grinder in the morning would be to soak and dehydrate sunflower seeds at home before the trip. You can grind up these soaked and dehydrated sunflower seeds into a powder in a coffee grinder to form an ‘instant milk.’ On the trail, just add the instant ‘milk’ powder to the raisin soak water and spices to form the milk that goes over the granola.

Raw Nori Rolls – dinner

In the morning before I leave camp, I start a 50/50 combination of buckwheat/sunflower seeds soaking in an old peanut butter jar (you can just soak sunflower seeds instead of the buckwheat/sunflower combination, but I like to have as much of a variety as possible in my diet on the trail to make sure I’m getting all the nutrients I need). I carry this with me all day long until I reach my dinner spot. For dinner, I drain the soaking seeds. Buckwheat produces a mucilaginous substance when it is soaked so I need to drain the jar well. I use some flexible screen material I buy at a hardware store, and rubber band it around the top of the jar for this purpose. I rinse and drain a few times and grind up the mixture in my baby food grinder. I spice and salt the mixture so it’s tasty and wrap it up in a raw nori sheet with some sprouts I’ve grown, along with any veggies I carry out of town or harvest along the trail, for a delicious dinner.

Cherie Soria has contributed some recipes for corn tortillas and various wraps. All of these wraps (recipes found below) can be used in place of raw nori sheets in the above Raw Nori Roll recipe. However, these wraps are much more prone to spoilage than nori sheets. If you use these wraps, you should make at home before the trip and store in the freezer until you are read to use. These wraps would be great for a weekend backpack trip. If you are going to put these wraps in a food box for a long distance backpack, you should invest in a quality vacuum sealer and store them in freezer in a vacuum sealed bag. Have your resupply person pull the vacuum sealed wraps out of the freezer and put them in your food box the day they mail the box to a resupply town.

Corn Tortillas - by Cherie Soria

Yield: 12 tortillas (6 servings)

4 cups chopped yellow bell pepper (about 4)
6 ears corn, kernels only (3 cups)
1 medium zucchini, peeled and chopped (1 cup)
1 1/2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon solar-dried sea salt
1 avocado, peeled, seeded, and mashed
3 tablespoons psyllium powder

1. In a high-powered blender, purée the bell pepper, corn, zucchini, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, and salt until smooth. Add the avocado and purée again. While the blender is still running, add the psyllium powder and blend well for a few seconds.

2. Using 1/2 cup of the mixture for each tortilla, use a flat rubber spatula to quickly form four flat disks on a dehydrator tray lined with a nonstick sheet. Each disk should be about 7 inches in diameter, and they should not quite touch each other. Spread the tortillas into round disks quickly, or the mixture will thicken and become difficult to spread.

3. Dehydrate at 105 degrees for 4 hours, or until you can easily remove them from the nonstick sheets.

4. Turn the tortillas over onto mesh dehydrator screens. Place an additional mesh screen on top of each tray of tortillas. This makes them flatter and easier to store. Continue dehydrating another 3 to 4 hours, until dry but still flexible.

5. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or in the freezer for up to two months.

Zucchini Pepper Wraps - by Cherie Soria

Yield: 12 wraps (6 servings)

6 cups chopped yellow bell pepper (about 6)
6 cups chopped zucchini (about 4 to 5)
1 avocado, peeled, seeded, and mashed
1/2 teaspoon solar-dried sea salt
1 1/2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
optional 3 tablespoons psyllium powder

1. In a high-powered blender, purée the bell peppers and zucchini until smooth. Add the avocado, salt, and the optional nutritional yeast, and blend again. While the blender is running, add the psyllium powder and blend well for a few seconds.

2. Using 1/2 cup of the mixture for each wrap, use a flat rubber spatula to quickly form four flat disks on a dehydrator tray lined with a nonstick sheet. Each disk should be about 7 inches in diameter, and they should not quite touch each other. Spread the wraps into round disks quickly, or the mixture will thicken and become difficult to spread.

3. Dehydrate at 105 degrees for about 4 hours, or until you can easily remove them from the nonstick sheets.

4. Turn the wraps over onto mesh dehydrator screens. Place an additional mesh screen on top of each tray of wraps. This makes them flatter and easier to store. Continue dehydrating another 3 to 4 hours, until dry but still flexible.

5. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or in the freezer for up to two months.

Salsa Wraps - by Cherie Soria

Yield: 12 wraps (6 servings)

5 cups tomatoes, seeds removed

3 cups seeded and chopped red bell peppers
2 cups chopped yellow zucchini
2 red jalapeño peppers, seeded
1 tablespoon red onion
2 teaspoons onion powder
1 to 2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2 teaspoon solar-dried sea salt
1 avocado, peeled, seeded, and mashed
3 tablespoons psyllium powder
1/4 cup chopped cilantro, packed, optional

1. In a high-powered blender, purée the tomatoes, bell peppers, zucchini, jalapeño peppers, and red onion until smooth. Add the onion powder, garlic, and salt, and purée again. While blender is still turning, add the avocado, and then the psyllium powder, and blend well for a few seconds.

2. If desired, pulse in the cilantro until it is broken into pieces. Do not fully process; the cilantro should be in small pieces.

3. Using 1/2 cup of the mixture for each wrap, use a flat rubber spatula to quickly form four flat disks on a dehydrator tray lined with a nonstick sheet. Each disk should be about 7 inches in diameter, and they should not quite touch each other. Spread the wraps into round disks quickly, or the mixture will thicken and become difficult to spread.

4. Dehydrate at 105 degrees for about 4 hours, or until you can easily remove them from the nonstick sheets.

5. Turn the wraps over onto mesh dehydrator screens. Place an additional mesh screen on top of each tray of wraps. This makes them flatter and easier to store. Continue dehydrating another 3 to 4 hours, until dry but still flexible.

6. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or in the freezer for up to two months.

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